fuzzybluemonkeys: I just read the most wonderful story about a beanstalk and an ogre and (oh really)
(Tomorrow.)

I suspect I'm going to be disappointed due to both the time-lapse (my tastes have changed since high school), and there's just no way to create a satisfying ending to all that plot buildup (plus the original author died and the last few books had to be written from his notes). But I'm going to start at the beginning and re-read all the ones I've already read and then read for the first time the ones I haven't read yet because I stopped reading in the hopes of waiting until it was actually done to do the whole thing at once (binge-reading!).
fuzzybluemonkeys: I just read the most wonderful story about a beanstalk and an ogre and (oh really)
Matter by Iain M. Banks

The Giver by Lois Lowry
Gathering Blue by Lois Lowry
Messenger by Lois Lowry
Son by Lois Lowry

Crispin: The Cross of Lead by Avi

The Robots of Dawn by Isaac Asimov

Impact by Douglas Preston

Valor Anthology by Various

John Dies At the End by David Wong
This Book is Full of Spiders by David Wong

An Evening At Joe's by The Cast and Crew of Highlander: the Series

Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloane

Cujo by Stephen King

City on the Edge of Forever by Harlan Ellison [Look, I have no doubt that a lot of people involved in the production of Star Trek (including Mr. Ellison) were ego-driven jerks whose tampering changed the episode from what was originally intended, but I still like the aired version better, whooops.]

Singer from the Sea by Sheri S. Tepper

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L'Engle [Wow, only one reread this year.]

Dancing Girls and Other Stories by Margaret Atwood

And I'm partway through William Sleator's Singularity.
fuzzybluemonkeys: I just read the most wonderful story about a beanstalk and an ogre and (oh really)
They always focus on the electronic aspect of SHIELD's record-keeping, but there's got to be a physical Archive somewhere (because paper backup that's why)(also because digitization will never quite capture the mud and blood and wrinkles and notes and drawings all over the Howling Commandos' "official" map of France).
And when SHIELD falls to Hydra, the Archive does not fall. Because you do not fuck with a Librarian. Or an Archivist. Or any library staff, really. Like, people who have dedicated their lives to the preservation of knowledge are not going to let Nazis destroy and/or corrupt that knowledge. (And the Preservation Department has lots of sharp objects in it, I'm just saying.)

And then when the info gets dumped on the internet, the head librarian is like, finally, I've been saying this for years, can we open the Archive to the public now?

Now I've just got to figure out what A.R.C.H.I.V.E. should stand for...


(Archival Resources Collective & Headquarters of Internally Verified Ephemera?)
fuzzybluemonkeys: I just read the most wonderful story about a beanstalk and an ogre and (oh really)
The Other Wind by Ursula K. Le Guin
Tales from Earthsea by Ursula K. Le Guin

Imajica by Clive Barker [trigger warnings: rape; dubious consent; more rape; even dubiouser consent]

Lionboy by Zizou Corder
Lionboy: The Chase by Zizou Corder
Lionboy: The Truth by Zizou Corder

One Hundred and One Dalmatians by Dodie Smith [re-read]

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins
Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins

The Princess Bride by William Goldman [re-read]

Acceptable Risk by Robin Cook [I don't know that it's triggering as such, but the author's "anti-depressants are evil" attitude actively pissed me off. Like, if it were just the characters' opinions, or they were choosing for themselves not to take medication, it would be one thing, but the narrative actively backs them up by having anti-depressants that turn you into an atavistic murderer, and uses that to basically be like "and therefore all anti-depressants are bad and you should bootstrap yourself into mental health with therapy and no drugs".]

Robopocalypse by Daniel H. Wilson

The Dark Half by Stephen King

The Circus of the Earth and the Air by Brooke Stevens

Right now I'm in the midst of Matter by Iain M. Banks
fuzzybluemonkeys: I just read the most wonderful story about a beanstalk and an ogre and (oh really)
The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul by Douglas Adams [re-read]

Foundation by Isaac Asimov
Foundation and Empire by Isaac Asimov
Second Foundation by Isaac Asimov

Dragon's Egg by Robert L. Forward [re-read]
Starquake by Robert L. Forward

Welcome to the Monkey House by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

Dark Water's Embrace by Stephen Leigh [re-read]

The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin [re-read]

A Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula K. Le Guin
The Tombs of Atuan by Ursula K. Le Guin
The Farthest Shore by Ursula K. Le Guin

Kraken by China Miéville

Monster Island by David Wellington

Kindred by Octavia Butler [re-read]

Monster Nation by David Wellington
Monster Planet by David Wellington

Tehanu by Ursula K. Le Guin

Starting out the new year with more Earthsea: The Other Wind
fuzzybluemonkeys: (dorktastic)
there were 6 episodes I have never seen before.

Including the last one The Trade-Ins, which had a book metaphor in the intro because Rod Serling just gets me, okay?

"Mr. and Mrs. John Holt, aging people who slowly and with trembling fingers turn the last pages of a book of life and hope against logic and the preordained that some magic printing press will add to this book another limited edition."

To be continued tomorrow/next year.
fuzzybluemonkeys: fuzzy blue monkey (Default)
The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul by Douglas Adams [re-read]

Foundation by Isaac Asimov
Foundation and Empire by Isaac Asimov
Second Foundation by Isaac Asimov

Dragon's Egg by Robert L. Forward [re-read]
Starquake by Robert L. Forward

Welcome to the Monkey House by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

Dark Water's Embrace by Stephen Leigh [re-read]

The back of Dark Water's Embrace compared it to The Left Hand of Darkness, so I figure I'll re-read that next as a segue into the Earthsea trilogy (which I have not yet read).
fuzzybluemonkeys: I just read the most wonderful story about a beanstalk and an ogre and (oh really)
The Strain by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan [re-read]
The Fall by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan
The Night Eternal by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan

World War Z by Max Brooks [re-read]

The Traveler by John Twelve Hawks [re-read]
The Dark River by John Twelve Hawks [re-read]
The Golden City by John Twelve Hawks

The Truth Machine by James L. Halperin [re-read]
The First Immortal by James L. Halperin [re-read]

Sabriel by Garth Nix [re-read]

Dark Lord of Derkholm by Diana Wynne Jones

Stars in My Pocket Like Grains of Sand by Samuel R. Delany

Rainbow's End by Vernor Vinge

The Ear, The Eye and The Arm by Nancy Farmer

Midnight Riot by Ben Aaronovitch

Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency by Douglas Adams [re-read]
(For some reason I though I hadn't read it, but then realized I had and kept going anyway.)
And then started the new year off with The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul by Douglas Adams [re-read].
fuzzybluemonkeys: (dorktastic)
Right. So. I wanna sell some of the many books I've made (because let's face it, even if I wrote all journals, all the timez, that shit would not be getting filled up-- also while I'm not in dire straits or anything, I am low on income at the moment).

So I set up a store on WePay because unlike etsy, they do not have a listing fee, which means that if/when my books do not sell, I will not have wasted 20 cents each trying to sell them. Of course the disadvantage is that WePay is a smaller site, but while etsy has the built-in audience of people wanting crafty things, that still doesn't necessarily mean they want my crafty things, or that they can find my crafty things amidst the tons of other crafty things, and did I mention that I only have to give WePay a cut if I actually sell something?

So that's the "logic" behind that, but clearly I have no idea what I'm doing, so if anyone would like to take pity on me and peruse the store and critique the hell out of it, that would be super helpful. Also super helpful: advice on how to advertise without you know, actually paying for advertising?

Yeah, I'm overly pleased with my "All books are bigger on the inside" thing. Deal with it.

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