fuzzybluemonkeys: I just read the most wonderful story about a beanstalk and an ogre and (oh really)
The Other Wind by Ursula K. Le Guin
Tales from Earthsea by Ursula K. Le Guin

Imajica by Clive Barker [trigger warnings: rape; dubious consent; more rape; even dubiouser consent]

Lionboy by Zizou Corder
Lionboy: The Chase by Zizou Corder
Lionboy: The Truth by Zizou Corder

One Hundred and One Dalmatians by Dodie Smith [re-read]

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins
Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins

The Princess Bride by William Goldman [re-read]

Acceptable Risk by Robin Cook [I don't know that it's triggering as such, but the author's "anti-depressants are evil" attitude actively pissed me off. Like, if it were just the characters' opinions, or they were choosing for themselves not to take medication, it would be one thing, but the narrative actively backs them up by having anti-depressants that turn you into an atavistic murderer, and uses that to basically be like "and therefore all anti-depressants are bad and you should bootstrap yourself into mental health with therapy and no drugs".]

Robopocalypse by Daniel H. Wilson

The Dark Half by Stephen King

The Circus of the Earth and the Air by Brooke Stevens

Right now I'm in the midst of Matter by Iain M. Banks
fuzzybluemonkeys: I just read the most wonderful story about a beanstalk and an ogre and (oh really)
The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul by Douglas Adams [re-read]

Foundation by Isaac Asimov
Foundation and Empire by Isaac Asimov
Second Foundation by Isaac Asimov

Dragon's Egg by Robert L. Forward [re-read]
Starquake by Robert L. Forward

Welcome to the Monkey House by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

Dark Water's Embrace by Stephen Leigh [re-read]

The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin [re-read]

A Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula K. Le Guin
The Tombs of Atuan by Ursula K. Le Guin
The Farthest Shore by Ursula K. Le Guin

Kraken by China Miéville

Monster Island by David Wellington

Kindred by Octavia Butler [re-read]

Monster Nation by David Wellington
Monster Planet by David Wellington

Tehanu by Ursula K. Le Guin

Starting out the new year with more Earthsea: The Other Wind
fuzzybluemonkeys: fuzzy blue monkey (Default)
The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul by Douglas Adams [re-read]

Foundation by Isaac Asimov
Foundation and Empire by Isaac Asimov
Second Foundation by Isaac Asimov

Dragon's Egg by Robert L. Forward [re-read]
Starquake by Robert L. Forward

Welcome to the Monkey House by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

Dark Water's Embrace by Stephen Leigh [re-read]

The back of Dark Water's Embrace compared it to The Left Hand of Darkness, so I figure I'll re-read that next as a segue into the Earthsea trilogy (which I have not yet read).
fuzzybluemonkeys: I just read the most wonderful story about a beanstalk and an ogre and (oh really)
The Strain by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan [re-read]
The Fall by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan
The Night Eternal by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan

World War Z by Max Brooks [re-read]

The Traveler by John Twelve Hawks [re-read]
The Dark River by John Twelve Hawks [re-read]
The Golden City by John Twelve Hawks

The Truth Machine by James L. Halperin [re-read]
The First Immortal by James L. Halperin [re-read]

Sabriel by Garth Nix [re-read]

Dark Lord of Derkholm by Diana Wynne Jones

Stars in My Pocket Like Grains of Sand by Samuel R. Delany

Rainbow's End by Vernor Vinge

The Ear, The Eye and The Arm by Nancy Farmer

Midnight Riot by Ben Aaronovitch

Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency by Douglas Adams [re-read]
(For some reason I though I hadn't read it, but then realized I had and kept going anyway.)
And then started the new year off with The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul by Douglas Adams [re-read].
fuzzybluemonkeys: I just read the most wonderful story about a beanstalk and an ogre and (oh really)
Just finished: Salem's Lot by Stephen King.

Next up: a continuation of the vampire theme with a reread of Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan's The Strain to refresh my memory before the first time read of its sequel The Fall.
fuzzybluemonkeys: (dorktastic)
So on the one hand, I probably shouldn't go to the Library Book Sale tomorrow because I have plenty of books to read and reread and I shouldn't be adding more to my collection when I'll probably just be moving again come the end of July.

On the other [evil grasping Gollum] hand:
BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOKSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS!
fuzzybluemonkeys: Rufus/Bucket of Sunshine (oh the humanity)
Why is it that when I read fiction about a topic I'm interested in, I could read for days, but when I try to read non-fiction about a topic I'm interested in, I read for five minutes until... Bored Now: Kitty! And then I drag myself back and read some more until Bored Now: Internets! And it's not for lack of interest. I mean, the whole reason I took "Topics in American Book History" was wanting it to be about the structural and manufacturing processes of book production, but while there were hints of it throughout the course, the majority of it was cultural analysis of what does it all meeeeeeeeeaaaaaan? So, for my "Formal Essay" final writing project whatchamawhosit, I decided to do a research paper on the stuff I wanted from the course, so that I would actually get the information. And it is interesting! Like the switch from leather to cloth and casing-in versus binding on boards and changing it so that instead of one person binding the book start to finish, it's all assembly line tasks, so that they could hire less skilled workers on the cheap and eventually replace them with machines (who will eventually rise up and take over the earth!).
So here I am all, "I want to know this!" and my brain is just like, "Nope, naptime!"
fuzzybluemonkeys: Rufus/Bucket of Sunshine (oh the humanity)
or, This Shit Is So Boring I Fell Asleep Reading It.


(Charlotte Temple by Susanna Rowson, in case you were wondering what to avoid)
fuzzybluemonkeys: Smith & Jones (Mickey & Martha) (partners)
So since I've been reading lots of Sherlock fanfic, I thought I'd [re-]read the actual thing. The first story in the book I have is the Irene Adler one, and guess where she's from? That's right, New Jersey.
So even back in the day, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle knew that you don't fuck with people from Jersey.
fuzzybluemonkeys: Anything you can geek, I can geek greater (geekery)
So, I've been reading Only Begotten Daughter by James Morrow, and it just occurred to me this morning how seasonally appropriate it is what with it being about Decomposing Zombie Jesus's half-sister (on the god side).
So far my favorite part is I wouldn't consider it a spoiler, but just in case. )
And I realize I probably shouldn't find that to be quite so, well... heartwarming, but I'm me, so I do.

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